Avocational Archeologists Guide to Information Resources on the World Wide Web


General Information Archaeology Tools On-Line Journals
Artifact Identification Other Topics Regional Organizations
Historical Archaeology For Kids National Level Organizations
  Points of Contact  

SCOPE: Recognizing that a large percentage of archeological work done in the United States is carried out by amateurs, working on their own or with professional archeologists, this page is dedicated to providing non-professional (avocational) archeologists with access to free, reliable sources of information about the field. It will provide links to sites that provide detailed information about artifact identification, archeological techniques, ethics, virtual museums covering various aspects of American history and pre-history, and sites that will enable contact with state historic preservation offices and local archeological societies that can provide guidance on how to do legitimate work in this field.


General Information:

Dictionary:

Anthromorphemics: Dictionary from the Anthropology Department at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Broken into three sections, this dictionary provides definitions of many terms used in Archaeology, Cultural Anthropology and Physical Anthropology.

Law & Ethics:

The Register of Professional Archaeologists: The Register of Professional Archaeologists is a listing of archaeologists who have agreed to abide by an explicit code of conduct and standards of research performance, who hold a graduate degree in archaeology, anthropology, art history, classics, history, or another germane discipline and who have substantial practical experience. The Code of Conduct, located on this site is a great basis for the ethical behavior expected of persons pursuing archaeology as a profession or as a hobby.

Laws & Regulations: National Park Services' list of Laws, Regulations and Standards that apply to Cultural Resources. It is our goal to provide links to the full text of the laws, regulations, standards and guidelines, and executive orders related to cultural resources management.

General Reference:

Arch-Net: Website, managed by the Arizona State University contains many links to archeology related sites.

Current News: News website run by Texas A & M to pull together news stories from major newspapers and broadcasters on the subject of Anthropology.

Archaeologica News: Collection of news from around the world dealing with archeology.

FAQ About a career in Archaeology: FAQ prepared by Dr. David Carlson, Texas A&M, on how to go about becoming an archaeologist.


Artifact Identification:

Stone Points and Tools:

Lithics-Net: The Center of the Web for Information on North American Aborigine Projectile Points and Lithics. Provides detailed identification help for stone points in North America. Indexes points by shape and in an alphabetical list. Diagrams indicate how to describe artifact features for identification.

NativeTech: Native American Technology and Art/Stone and Stone Tools:Informative site covering the use of stone for toolmaking. Focused on the northeast. Contains links to other related sites.

Interpreting the Function of Stone Tools" by Roger Grace: On-line book that goes into detail about the science of determining the uses of stone tools found at archaeological sites. Heavy Reading!

Native American Projectile Point Classification Guide: The purpose of this guide is to provide a simplified system for the classification of projectile points found in Delaware. It is formulated as a series of questions about the artifact you want to classify. Sometimes the question is in multiple-choice form. Other times it is a yes/no choice. Depending on your answer, you might be directed to another question: or you may find out the name archaeologists use for your point.

Stone Age Reference Collection: Extensive website providing many details about stone tools , their use, manufacture and materials. Hosted by the
Institute for Arkeologi, Kunsthistorie og Konservering, in Oslo, Norway. All text is available in English or Norwegian. Lots of good drawings and photographs. Raw Material section could be very useful in identifying minerals used in toolmaking.

Use of Geologic Materials by Prehistoric Cultures: Short page showing how native Americans in Iowa made use of Geological Resources. A few nice pictures.

Prehistoric Ceramics:

Diagnostic Artifacts in Maryland: Prehistoric Pottery in Maryland. Excellent selection of photos and descriptions of prehistoric ceramics found in Maryland. Developed by the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory at the Jefferson-Patterson Park.

Native Tech: Native American Technology and Art/Pottery and Clay: Informative site covering the creation of pottery as performed by native Americans. Focuses on the Southern New England Region. Extensive book list for those interested in Native American Pottery.

Gather Around this Pot: A Canadian site that provides a comprehensive look at the creation and use of ceramic pottery prior to arrival of the Europeans.

Hollister Collection of Southwestern Native American Pottery: A type collection of 94 pieces of Southwestern Pottery.

Historical Ceramics:

Diagnostic Artifacts in Maryland: Historic Pottery in Maryland. Excellent selection of photos and descriptions of historic ceramics found in Maryland. Developed by the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory at the Jefferson-Patterson Park.

Faunal Remains:

Zooarchaeology Home Page: This web site is intended to assist people interested in this field of study by providing links to other sites that we have found useful. If you explore many of these links, you will discover numerous others.

FaunMap: An Illinois State University Project that lets you map out the distribution of animals over various periods of time.Fun to play with if you want to see if it is possible that an animal bone you have found has been found to live in your area.

Forensics:

Dental Analysis in Archaeology: A webpage with information about how teeth and analysis of teeth can help in archeological studies. Contains links to several other pages about teetha and archeology.


Historical Archaeology:

The 5 Points Site: Archaeologists and historians rediscover a famous nineteenth-century New York neighborhood. A great guide to how archaeology can take place in an urban setting.

Society for Industrial Archeology: Information about an organization that concentrates on archeology of industrial sites.

The Jamestown Rediscovery Project: Jamestown Rediscovery is investigating the remains of 1607-1698 Jamestown on the APVA property on Jamestown Island, Virginia.


Archaeology Tools:

Marshalltown Trowels: On-line source for a complete line of trowels suitable for fieldwork.

Other Topics:

Archaeoastronomy: This is the official website of the Center for Archaeoastronomy and ISAAC, the International Society for Archaeoastronomy and Astronomy in Culture. We are a source of peer-reviewed scientific and editorial materials in archaeoastronomy, ethnoastronomy, archaeology and the history of science. We have published these materials in our journal, Archaeoastronomy: The Journal of Astronomy in Culture and in our Archaeoastronomy & Ethnoastronomy Newsletter, essays from which are now available to read on this website.

Dating: Short course in using standard tools for dating archaeological artifacts. Produced by George H. Michaels and Brian M. Fagan for the Regents University of California.

Mapping: AHDS Guide to using CAD tools to produce maps of archaeological sites.

Remote Sensing: A website from NASA covering the use of remote sensing at three archaeological site. A good Introduction.

The Remote Sensing Tutorial: Excellent website that covers ALL aspects of remote sensing performed from space. Not really tied to archaeology but gives a great sense of what can be done.

Ground Penetrating Radar: This site, Ground Penetrating Radar in Archaeology, covers the basics of using GPR at an archaeological site.

Remote Sensing Survey Report: Boston University students conducted remote sensing at the Nathan and Polly Johnson House at 21 Seventh Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts. This was a final project for a semester-long class at Boston University. The site provided a real-world setting for students to learn some of the mechanics, strengths, and limitations of three methods of geophysical prospecting.

ClayStation's Pit-Fire Techniques: Introduction and History: By reading through this Firing Guide, you will get well acquainted with the Pit firing process and be fully prepared to participate in the process with someone who is experienced in this type of firing process. This information is inspired by the techniques shown by Lancet. Lancet is a Ceramics and Sculpture Professor at Solano Community College in northern California.


For Kids:

The Community Archaeology Program: On-line Archaeology Guide for Kids. Provides general information about archeology geared to kid's interests. Sponsored by the State University of New York at Binghamton.

Colonial Williamsburg for Kids: Kids guide to archeology at Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia.

Crow Canyon Archeology for Kids: Kids page developed to explain archeology at Crow Canyon in Colorado. Includes a kid's question page.

Kids Dig Reeds Farmstead: Virtual exploration of the archaeological site at Reeds Farmstead in West virginia. Lots of activities.

Archaeological Adventure: An interactive website that introduces the concepts of archaeology. It is focused more on European and African sites but still conveys important information about the field.


On-Line Journals:

Archaeology Magazine:The on-line publication from the Archaeological Institute of America. Contains excerpts from their print journal, links to current news articles and links to many archaeology related sites.


Regional Organizations:

National Parks Service: Southeast Archaeological Center: Southeast Archeological Center has carried out a tradition of archeological research, collections and information management, and technical support for national park units located in the Southeast Region of the National Park Service (NPS). The Center continues its historical support functions as well as a wide variety of technical assistance and partnership projects both within and outside NPS.

The Anasazi Heritage Center: The Anasazi Heritage Center is a museum of the Ancestral Puebloan (or Anasazi) culture and other Native cultures in the Four Corners region. It is also the starting point for visits to Canyons of the Ancients National Monument.The site is run by the Bureau of Land Management office in Colorado.


National Level Organizations:

Society of American Archaeology: The Society for American Archaeology (SAA) is an international organization dedicated to the research, interpretation, and protection of the archaeological heritage of the Americas. With more than 6,100 members, the society represents professional, student, and avocational archaeologists working in a variety of settings including government agencies, colleges and universities, museums, and the private sector.

Society for Historical Archaeology: Formed in 1967, the Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA) is the largest scholarly group concerned with the archaeology of the modern world (A.D. 1400-present). The main focus of the society is the era since the beginning of European exploration. SHA promotes scholarly research and the dissemination of knowledge concerning historical archaeology. The society is specifically concerned with the identification, excavation, interpretation, and conservation of sites and materials on land and underwater. Geographically the society emphasizes the New World, but also includes European exploration and settlement in Africa, Asia, and Oceania.

Archaeological Institute of America:The Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) has been dedicated to the encouragement and support of archaeological research and publication and to the protection of the world's cultural heritage for more than a century. A non-profit cultural and educational organization chartered by the U.S. Congress, it is the oldest and largest archaeological organization in North America, with more than 11,000 members around the world.

The Archaeological Conservancy: The Archaeological Conservancy, established in 1980, is the only national non-profit organization dedicated to acquiring and preserving the best of our nation's remaining archaeological sites. Based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Conservancy also operates regional offices in Georgia, Virginia, Ohio, and California.

National Park Service: Links to the Past: Main Gateway to the National Park Services' extensive web of interpretive web pages. Covers thousands of topics.


Points-of-Contact:

National Association of State Archaeologists: Complete, up-to-date listing of state archaeologists for all fifty states and the U.S. Territories.

State Historic Preservation Office:

ALABAMA HAWAII MICHIGAN NEW YORK TEXAS
ALASKA IDAHO MISSOURI NEVADA UTAH
ARKANSAS IOWA MINNESOTA OHIO VIRGINIA
ARIZONA ILLINOIS MISSISSIPPI OKLAHOMA VERMONT
CALIFORNIA INDIANA MONTANA OREGON WASHINGTON
COLORADO KANSAS NORTH CAROLINA PENNSYLVANIA WISCONSIN
CONNECTICUT KENTUCKY NORTH DAKOTA PUERTO RICO WEST VIRGINIA
D.C. LOUISIANA NEBRASKA RHODE ISLAND WYOMING
DELAWARE MASSACHUSETTS NEW HAMPSHIRE SOUTH CAROLINA  
FLORIDA MARYLAND NEW JERSEY SOUTH DAKOTA  
GEORGIA MAINE NEW MEXICO TENNESSEE  


State Archaeology Societies:

ALABAMA HAWAII MICHIGAN NEW YORK TEXAS
ALASKA IDAHO MISSOURI NEVADA UTAH
ARKANSAS IOWA MINNESOTA OHIO VIRGINIA
ARIZONA ILLINOIS MISSISSIPPI OKLAHOMA VERMONT
CALIFORNIA INDIANA MONTANA OREGON WASHINGTON
COLORADO KANSAS NORTH CAROLINA PENNSYLVANIA WISCONSIN
CONNECTICUT KENTUCKY NORTH DAKOTA PUERTO RICO WEST VIRGINIA
D.C. LOUISIANA NEBRASKA RHODE ISLAND WYOMING
DELAWARE MASSACHUSETTS NEW HAMPSHIRE SOUTH CAROLINA  
FLORIDA MARYLAND NEW JERSEY SOUTH DAKOTA  
GEORGIA MAINE NEW MEXICO TENNESSEE  


List-Servs: List of List-Servs and Electronic-Newsgroups with a focus on Archaeology. Part of the Arch-Net website.


Disclaimer: This is a living document. Dead links, as well as candidates for additions to this list, should be reported to John Fiveash. While I have made every attempt to exclude sites that provide questionable information, I can not vouch for the data contained in ANY of these sites. If you have questions about archaeology, artifact identification, or any other related subject, please contact your state archaeologist or an Archaeological Society near you. Links to these are provided in the Points-of-Contact Section below.

Presence of a site on this list does not constitute endorsement of any commercial or non-commercial product, nor validity of information contained on that site by the Archeology Society of Maryland, Inc. Notice of any errors or inaccuracies should be reported to John Fiveash as soon as possible. Removal or correction of links will be taken care of as soon as possible.